Tips to Create a Disaster Kit : Clearly Written
HomeAbout UsServicesContact UsPhoto Gallery
TestimonialsBLOGAuthor's Page

Call today for a FREE phone consultation! 
412-913-9191
     Director of Communication & Technology

Tips to Create a Disaster Kit

by Dorothy L. Clear, CPO on 09/04/18

One can never be entirely ready for an emergency, but I have had a few experiences that have driven home the ideal of being ready for anything before it happens. Here are a few examples:

The date was April 11, 1987. There was a train derailment in my neighborhood, and we had to evacuate due to a toxic chemical spill. I remember that my dad had t-shirts made up for our family that said, "I survived Bloomfield's train derailment".

On another occasion, the East End of Pittsburgh lost electrical power for five days due to a "macro-burst"on May 31, 2002. Due to the pounding rain, high winds and lightning, a large tree at the end of our street was ripped out of the ground and took out the power lines with it.

Luckily, as a former Girl Scout, I was taught to always be prepared. Along with my Girl Scout training, I am the type of person who naturally remains calm in a crisis.

The National Association of Productivity and Organizing Professionals (NAPO) designates the month of September as Emergency Preparedness Month. Therefore, I wanted this month's blog to provide you with some tips to prepare for a natural disaster.  

In Western Pennsylvania a natural disaster might include flooding, thunderstorms, microbursts, snowstorms, fire, electrical blackouts. The better prepared you are, the safer you will be. Here are some tips from the American Red Cross on what to put in a family disaster kit. Keep your kit in a designated convenient location in your home.

  • A three to five-day supply of daily medications.

  • Stock up on batteries of different sizes.

  • Have a flashlight or lantern in a convenient location.

  • Blankets

  • Change of dry clothes

  • First aid kit

  • Toiletries: soap, toothbrush, toothpaste, baby wipes.

  • One gallon of water per person.

  • Dry foods or snacks

  • A whistle

  • Paper and pen

If you have an infant or a toddler you will need every day baby supplies depending on the age of the child. You may also need things for your pets, i.e. food, bowls, medicines, leash, ownership and vaccine papers.

Consider having a secondary emergency kit in your car in the event you are stuck in traffic, stranded due to rain, road closures due to an a traffic accident, or your car breaks down and you have to wait for help to arrive.

I suggest that you review your disaster kits every September to see what inside the kit may need updated. Clear Organization will be happy to help you in this process.

Comments (0)


Leave a comment